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Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, September 29, 2014

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Rachel Williamson explains why Egyptian President Abdul Fattah al-Sisi's plan to formalize Egypt's black market economy may not have the desired effect.

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Venezuela Set to Play a Bigger Role at the U.N.

When the late Hugo Chávez came to the United Nations, it was usually a media event. Journalists would swarm around him looking for a juicy quote, and he frequently obliged. The apex of Chávez's performances at the global forum came in 2006, when he called George W. Bush "the devil," and said the podium, the same one Bush had used, "still smelled of sulfur."  The media was enthralled.

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In Post-Qaddafi Libya, It's Stay Silent or Die

On Sept. 19, Benghazi witnessed a string of assassinations that seemed to be coordinated. The assassins targeted military and security personnel as well as civilians. Among those killed were two teenage civil society activists, Sami al-Kawafi and Tawfik Bensaud. They were 17 and 18 years old respectively. Their murders have capped off more than two years of extremist attacks on peace activists and journalists, killings that are endangering any remaining freedoms Libyans still have.

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Democracy Lab Weekly Brief, September 22, 2014

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Brian Klaas and Marcel Dirsus urge Tunisia's foreign allies to help the country rein in extremist groups ahead of this year's elections.

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Don't Get Sick in Venezuela

In the 1980s, few singers in Venezuela were as popular as Yordano Di Marzo. By combining elements of jazz, Caribbean bolero, and Italian pop music with poetic lyrics, the Rome-born Yordano became a smashing success. It is fair to say that everybody in the country older than thirty knows at least one Yordano song by heart.

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